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The Esther and Winnie Archive
Documenting an Easter Egger Chicken and Golden Laced Wyandotte
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Page Nineteen
Esther and Winnie Fluff to Feathers
The Archive

Golden Laced Wyandotte and Easter Egg Chicken as they grow from chick to Hen
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08/15/2007 3:49 pm
barg
silkiechicken wrote:
Maybe in a few weeks the older girls will forget the younger ones and they can go through the re intro process again. Hopefully the older girls didn't learn that you'll take out the intruders if they kept beating on them...

When the wall was taken down and the pullets had access to the chicks they also gained access to twice the space they had before, and also greens to eat.
Now that the chicks are not with them, they have lost this space and the greens that go with it.
If I made mistakes and gave them posative reinforcement for their bad behavior, I am hopeing that this loss associated with the absent chicks, will counter that.

SpottedCrow wrote:
If you take the biggest bully and hold her to the ground, like you were the roo, that would assert your dominance over the hen. After a few seconds let her up.

This sounds very similar to the ideas Colleen's work friend gave us although the specifics are a little different.
I'm definatly going to spend some time with them, in a nutral place and in pairs next time.
The way you describe showing that you are the roo, will come in handy for that.
Collens friend suggested that we get a super soaker for when they are in the coop and you cant get to them as quickly.

SpottedCrow wrote:
If all else fails, you might have to take the new girls out, and reintroduce them later on. Is there one of the "big"girls that doesn't beat on them as much...maybe you can put her with them...

You and Colleens friend seem to agree on this point;
I'll be putting a single, less aggressive pullet, in with them and keeping a close eye on them, making sure that they understand when they are being bad girls.

The chicks arn't going to have any contact with the pullets for several days.
I'm hopeing they forget each other so I can start fresh.
The next time they have visual contact with each other, the chicks will be bigger and the pullets may not even recognize them.

I am going to get this group integrated!
Next time I'll be taking it more slowly and having more control over the entire situation. This is going to be my show, not the chickens and I'm going to be in control not them.

Thanks again guys

More to come...


08/15/2007 3:51 pm
barg

(Note: this was somehow posted twice in the original thread and was never fixed, I have decided to leave it that way.)

silkiechicken wrote:
Maybe in a few weeks the older girls will forget the younger ones and they can go through the re intro process again. Hopefully the older girls didn't learn that you'll take out the intruders if they kept beating on them...

When the wall was taken down and the pullets had access to the chicks they also gained access to twice the space they had before, and also greens to eat.
Now that the chicks are not with them, they have lost this space and the greens that go with it.
If I made mistakes and gave them posative reinforcement for their bad behavior, I am hopeing that this loss associated with the absent chicks, will counter that.

SpottedCrow wrote:
If you take the biggest bully and hold her to the ground, like you were the roo, that would assert your dominance over the hen. After a few seconds let her up.

This sounds very similar to the ideas Colleen's work friend gave us although the specifics are a little different.
I'm definatly going to spend some time with them, in a nutral place and in pairs next time.
The way you describe showing that you are the roo, will come in handy for that.
Collens friend suggested that we get a super soaker for when they are in the coop and you cant get to them as quickly.

SpottedCrow wrote:
If all else fails, you might have to take the new girls out, and reintroduce them later on. Is there one of the "big"girls that doesn't beat on them as much...maybe you can put her with them...

You and Colleens friend seem to agree on this point;
I'll be putting a single, less aggressive pullet, in with them and keeping a close eye on them, making sure that they understand when they are being bad girls.

backyardgirls wrote:
. I only let them have access to eachother when I was there to supervise. .

The chicks arn't going to have any contact with the pullets for several days.
I'm hopeing they forget each other so I can start fresh.
The next time they have visual contact with each other, the chicks will be bigger and the pullets may not even recognize them.

I am going to get this group integrated!
Next time I'll be taking it more slowly and having more control over the entire situation. This is going to be my show, not the chickens and I'm going to be in control not them.

Thanks again guys

More to come....

08/15/2007 5:16 pm
Agilityscots
Hi Barg,

Sorry to hear things didn't go so well--try not to beat yourself up too much. I think you can only do these things by trial and error! I would have done the same thing you did!

I looked at Winnie's picture on page 17 (I think it was) and NO WAY is Winnie a roo. Now, I'm absolutely no expert...but my boy is 8.5 weeks old--quite a bit younger than yours--and he was showing obvious signs of being a boy at 6.5 weeks. Winnie doesn't appear to have any wattles yet, and her comb just looks lightly pink. My Ophelia (GLW) looks just like your Winnie, but my boy GLW has deep red comb and wattles. The appearance is totally different, and I'm glad I have the two to compare, side by side. My boy's "boyness" is unmistakable at this point...so you would have known long before this. I think Winnie's definitely a girl!

Amy

08/16/2007 11:01 am
SandraChick
I highly recommend using the night method to introducing new birds....

It helps if the chickens have had time to get to know eachother through fencing (which you have done)

Wait until after dark, when everyone is settled. Then add the new girls on the roosts.

If they wake up together, they typically are much less stressed about it.

Sandra

08/16/2007 1:06 pm
barg
SandraChick wrote:
I highly recommend using the night method to introducing new birds....
Wait until after dark, when everyone is settled. Then add the new girls on the roosts.
If they wake up together, they typically are much less stressed about it. Sandra

Well, as shown on page 16, They have spent a night together already, that went fine until the next day.

If you could explain further how exactly to go about this, or have I already tried this when they slept in the chicken house the other night?


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

#188 08/17/2007 3:22 am
barg
9 week portaits
Easter Egg Chicken 9 weeks old

Golden Laced Wyandotte pullet 9 weeks old
2 days till 10 weeks

Last edited by barg (08/17/2007 3:23 am)

08/17/2007 4:09 am
lurky
Barg.......I have 3 seperate pens for my birds. That is the best way. The pens are side by side and they only have chicken wire between them. So they are close enough to be together, but the bigger ones cannot touch the younger ones. I will probably leave them that way, but you always have the option of trying intro's from time to time just to see how it goes.
#190 08/17/2007 7:54 am
SandraChick
barg-

I think you have done it in one sense. But I also think the surprise in the morning can make a difference.

I was also wondering....during your reitroduction, did you have several feeders and waterers around. Adding a couple makes it a change in their whole surroundings too and it gives the little ones the chance to eat while others are busy eating elsewhere.

I freerange, so when I introduce a new bird, they can stay far away and slowing integrate into the group. The bottom of the pecking order often does the most pecking (as if to say, now I can finally pick on someone!). Additionally, they all go into the coop to roost in order of dominance. I've noticed a few times, that one will go into the coop in the evening and come right back out..as if they got the NOT YET signal. Then they'll put just their heads into through the door and check things out before heading in.

My advantage is I have lots of space for them to work things out.

I truly hope you have more luck---as you already know, every flock is a little different.

Edited to add: just read a success story and thought it might be nice to see how it worked out for them...here's the link. http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/v … p?id=14163

Sandra

Last edited by SandraChick (08/17/2007 1:06 pm)

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